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Archive for the 'Long Live Planet Earth!' Category

No U.S. Leader Has Done More To Advance The Fight Against Climate Change Than President Barack Obama

Posted by Michelle Moquin on 11th October 2016

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Good Morning!

I’ve written countless times about the wonderful things Obama has accomplished in his 8 years as our beloved president. I’m going to continue to give him the kudos he deserves as long as I can.

Here’s another for the environment:

We Need A President Who Will Continue Obama’s Climate Legacy — Not Destroy It

Obama has helped transform the U.S. into a global climate leader. The wrong successor could undo this progress.

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Environmental activists say no U.S. leader has done more to advance the fight against climate change than President Barack Obama.

President Barack Obama will leave the White House in January with a proud environmental legacy. Despite fierce opposition in Congress and some resistance abroad, the president has managed to pass several key climate initiatives at home and brokered several important global deals to curtail greenhouse gas emissions. The Paris Agreement, the most significant climate change accord in history, is perhaps Obama’s crowning achievement.

“No U.S. president has done more to advance the fight against climate change. By a long shot,” wrote Lou Leonard, the head of the World Wildlife Fund’s climate change program, in The Huffington Post last month. “Whether driving domestic policy through the Environmental Protection Agency as Congress dithered, or using his diplomatic powers to make climate change a legitimate top foreign policy issue, President Obama has elevated climate and clean energy as no president has before.”

But as the ongoing legal and Congressional battle over Obama’s Clean Power Plan that aims to curb power plant emissions in the U.S. makes clear, there is no shortage of opponents eager to dismantle the climate gains that the president has achieved in almost eight years of office. The November election could determine a great deal about how America’s climate change story unravels from here.

As Obama himself told The New York Times last month, all of his climate achievements could be “undone at the ballot box.”

“I think it’s fair to say that if Donald Trump is elected, for example, you have a pretty big shift now with how the EPA operates,” he said.

But it’s not just the future of the Environmental Protection Agency that’s at stake. Here are some of Obama’s top environmental accomplishments as president. Will his successor defend and extend these climate gains, or destroy them, along with the environment?

An Energy Sea Change And Slashed Emissions

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Under Obama, the United States has moved away from coal and embraced cleaner forms of energy.

Under Obama, the United States has undergone an energy transformation. It’s moved away from coal, which environmentalists have called the “single greatest threat to our climate,” while embracing cleaner forms of energy.

When the president first took office, 48 percent of American’s electricity came from coal. Today, it’s about 30 percent, The Associated Press reports.

“There were gigantic changes happening in the energy world, gigantic tectonic changes,” Peter Fox-Penner of the Boston University Institute for Sustainable Energy told the news outlet in September. “It’s a sea change. There is no question.”

With these changes has come another critical shift: over the past decade, U.S. emissions of carbon dioxide have fallen more than 10 percent. This is an insufficient reduction, some activists stress. But it’s a start. In 2015, U.S. CO2 emissions dropped by 145 millions tons, making it the world leader in lowering emissions.

There are many factors to credit for this decline, including the recession and technological advancements in the oil and gas industry. But as New York Magazine’s Jonathan Chait explained in 2013, Obama deserves some of the credit, too. In 2009, the president had pushed through a stimulus package that increased research and spending in renewables including solar and wind. Wind power generation had since doubled in the U.S., Chait said, while solar power had risen six-fold.

The Obama administration also increased fuel mileage requirements for cars and introduced new standards for cleaner gasoline, as well as appliance and building energy efficiency.

The Clean Power Plan

n Generating Station, on May 29, 2014 in Newburg, Maryland. Next w

Industry groups accuse Obama of declaring “war on coal” in his plan to cut greenhouse gas emissions cuts from power plants by 32 percent within 14 years.

When Obama unveiled the Clean Power Plan in August last year, it was hailed as the strongest action ever taken by a U.S. president to combat climate change. The plan, which gives the EPA the authority to regulate carbon pollution from power plants, aims for greenhouse gas emissions cuts from power plants of 32 percent by 2030.

Obama, who used the authority of an existing 1970 law to bypass Congress, called the Clean Power Plan a “moral obligation” for Americans.

But the law has been met with vehement opposition from dozens of states, corporations and industry groups who’ve called the regulation Obama’s “war on coal.” The Supreme Court has temporarily blocked the legislation. The stay is set to remain in place until after the election.

Paris Climate Accord And Other Global Initiatives

Barack Obama, Anote Tong, Christopher Loeak, Peter O'Neill, Kenny Anthony, Freundel Stuart

President Barack Obama, third from left, with heads of state from small island nations most at risk from the harmful effects of climate change, in Paris on Dec. 1, 2015.

Outside of the United States, Obama has been proactive in pushing other nations to commit to climate action.

In 2013, for instance, Obama and China President Xi Jinping signed an agreement to reduce emissions of hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, which are used as refrigerants and are thousands of times more potent than CO2 at trapping heat. This week, world leaders are meeting in Rwanda to discuss a deal to ban the so-called “super greenhouse gas.”

Obama also played a central role in the brokering of the landmark Paris Climate Agreement, which is set to be activated in November. The accord, which commits nations to preventing a more than 2C rise of average global temperatures above pre-industrial levels, “gives us the best possible shot to save the one planet we got,” Obama said last week.

Closer to home, Obama rejected the controversial Keystone XL pipeline last November. The pipeline, which environmental groups had protested for years, would have transported hundreds of thousands of barrels of oil a day from Alberta, Canada to the U.S.

As a “global leader, when it comes to taking serious action to fight climate change,” the president said America “frankly” could not approve the project.

Some observers said Obama’s decision then allowed him to start a dialogue about climate change with Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau, who had just been sworn into office.

By March, Obama and Trudeau had agreed to a climate partnership, which Mexico’s President Enrique Peña Nieto later also signed. The agreement included a joint goal of generating half of North America’s electricity from low-carbon sources by 2025.

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Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Obama have signed an agreement with a joint goal of generating half of North America’s electricity from low-carbon sources by 2025.

There are other wins on Obama’s environmental record. In particular, the protection of more environments than any other president in history, including the establishment of the world’s largest marine reserve. He also established the country’s first National Ocean Policy and the Great Outdoors Initiative. In 2013, Obama became the third U.S. president to install solar panels on the White House.

For all these successes, however, Obama has had his fair share of critics. Some activists say he hasn’t done enough, while opponents argue he’s overstepped his boundaries. The cap-and-trade bill he failed to push through during his first term is a notable failure.

Ultimately, Obama leaves “an ambitious and divisive legacy” to his successor, said The New York Times in September — from the contentious Clean Power Plan to the lofty Paris Agreement.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton has made her position on climate change clear. At Sunday night’s debate, the former secretary of state called the issue a “serious problem.” She’s previously vowed to meet, and even exceed, the climate goals that Obama has set ― including generating enough renewable energy “power every home in America,” and both cutting energy waste and American oil consumption by a third within 10 years.

GOP nominee Donald Trump, on the other hand, has a decidedly more dangerous position. He has called climate change “bullshit” and a “hoax” that he insists the Chinese government created to destroy American manufacturing. He has vowed to dismantle the EPA, repeal the Clean Power Plan and “renegotiate” the Paris Climate Accord.

The former reality TV personality has also vowed to resuscitate the Keystone XL Pipeline. “I want it built but I want a piece of the profits,” Trump said in May. “That’s how we’re going to make our country rich again.”

Obama has said time and again that he believes climate action will be the most significant legacy of his presidency.

Climate change “poses a greater threat to future generations” than any other challenge, he’s said. So ensuring America’s role as a torchbearer in this fight has been crucial.

“Today the United States is leading on climate change,” Obama said in November, after rejecting Keystone.

Let’s keep it that way.

❤️❤️❤️

Thank you Mr. President for all that you do. You will be the first president that I will shed tears over after leaving office. You are a true president of the people, and you will be dearly missed. My future HOPE is that your legacy will have long legs for many years to come.

Readers: Blog me.

Social Butterfly: “Pussy Bow” aka: Pussycat Bow” is a name for a soft floppy bow that ties around the neck. This name was given because it takes the form of a bow similar to the ones tied around the necks of cats. It’s a term that originated from the 1930′s, so considering she is not from this country I doubt she knew it. The gods having fun maybe? :)

 ✌🏽&❤️

Lastly, greed over a great story is surfacing from my “loyal”(?) readers. With all this back and forth about who owns what, that appears on my blog, let me reiterate that all material posted on my blog becomes the sole property of my blog. If you want to reserve any proprietary rights don’t post it to my blog. I will prominently display this caveat on my blog from now on to remind those who may have forgotten this notice.

Gratefully your blog host,

michelle

Aka BABE: We all know what this means by now :)

If you love my blog and my writes, please make a donation via PayPal, credit card, or e-check, please click the “Donate” button below. (Please only donations from those readers within the United States. – International readers please see my “Donate” page)

Or if you would like to send a check via snail mail, please make checks payable to “Michelle Moquin”, and send to:

Michelle Moquin PO Box 29235 San Francisco, Ca. 94129

Thank you for your loyal support!

All content on this site are property of Michelle Moquin © copyright 2008-2016

me

“Though she be but little, she be fierce.” – William Shakespeare Midsummer Night’s Dream 

" Politics, god, Life, News, Music, Family, Personal, Travel, Random, Photography, Religion, Aliens, Art, Entertainment, Food, Books, Thoughts, Media, Culture, Love, Sex, Poetry, Prose, Friends, Technology, Humor, Health, Writing, Events, Movies, Sports, Video, Christianity, Atheist, Blogging, History, Work, Education, Business, Fashion, Barack Obama, People, Internet, Relationships, Faith, Photos, Videos, Hillary Clinton, School, Reviews, God, TV, Philosophy, Fun, Science, Environment, Design, The Page, Rants, Pictures, Church, Blog, Nature, Marketing, Television, Democrats, Parenting, Miscellaneous, Current Events, Film, Spirituality, Obama, Musings, Home, Human Rights, Society, Comedy, Me, Random Thoughts, Research, Government, Election 2008, Baseball, Opinion, Recipes, Children, Iraq, Funny, Women, Economics, America, Misc, Commentary, John McCain, Reflections, All, Celebrities, Inspiration, Lifestyle, Theology, Linux, Kids, Games, World, India, Literature, China, Ramblings, Fitness, Money, Review, War, Articles, Economy, Journal, Quotes, NBA, Crime, Anime, Islam, 2008, Stories, Prayer, Diary, Jesus, Buddha, Muslim, Israel, Europe, Links, Marriage, Fiction, American Idol, Software, Leadership, Pop culture, Rants, Video Games, Republicans, Updates, Political, Football, Healing, Blogs, Shopping, USA, Class, Matrix, Course, Work, Web 2.0, My Life, Psychology, Gay, Happiness, Advertising, Field Hockey, Hip-hop, sex, fucking, ass, Soccer, sox"

Posted in Health & Well Being, Long Live Planet Earth!, Political Powwow | 15 Comments »

Flap Your Lips Friday

Posted by Michelle Moquin on 7th October 2016

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Good morning. 

The republicans will do anything try to get an edge on the election. At a time when Hurricane Matthew is hitting Florida, Florida Republican Governor, Rick Scott, refuses to extend Florida’s voter registration.

Here’s the write from the Huff Po:

Rick Scott Refuses To Extend Florida’s Voter Registration Due To Hurricane

“Everybody’s had a lot of time to register.”

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Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) won’t extend the state’s voter registration deadline as an enormous storm is set to bear down on the coast.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) refuses to extend his state’s voter registration deadline because of Hurricane Matthew, a Category 4 storm approaching the U.S. southeast coast.

The storm, predicted to be the strongest to make landfall in the U.S. in more than a decade, prompted Hillary Clinton’s campaign to call for extending voter registration beyond next Tuesday’s deadline.

“We’re hoping and expecting that officials in Florida are adapting deadlines to account for the storm,” Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook told reporters Thursday.

Scott, who has endorsed Republican nominee Donald Trump for president, said he wouldn’t honor that request.

“I’m not going to extend it,” Scott said during a press conference Thursday evening. “Everybody’s had a lot of time to register. On top of that, we have lots of opportunities to vote, early voting and absentee voting, so I don’t intend to make any changes.”

Scott quickly faced pushback. Speaking with MSNBC’s Chris Hayes, Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D) said she and other members of the state’s congressional delegation would send a letter to Scott pressing him to extend the deadline from Tuesday to Friday.

“It’s clearly the responsible and essential thing to do, we have people who have been expecting to have a few extra days before that deadline to register to vote,” Wasserman Schultz said. “That’s the most fundamental right we have is to be able to register and cast our ballot to select our leaders and, you know, I certainly hope Gov. Scott will … reconsider.”

Wasserman Schultz’s office told The Huffington Post that all members of the Florida delegation, including Republicans, are invited to sign the letter.

South Carolina, which the storm also is forecast to hit, has already extended its voter registration deadline.

*****

Readers: Floridians make your phone calls. Use your voice.

My heart goes out to those that have been killed in Haite due to Hurricane Matthew. I HOPE that all of my readers and their loved ones, who are in the path of Hurricane Matthew, are safe and sound. ❤️

Before I sign off and declare that the forum is open, let me just say this…I know that Hillary is winning according to the polls but let’s not start celebrating just yet. And just as important, let’s not stop giving our support whether you are lending your time by canvasing or making phone calls.

And if you can give a few dollars, they could use that too. The campaign has been lagging in fundraising for 3 months in a row. The Clinton campaign has missed their fundraising goals in August and September. And they are $100,000 off base for October.

Trump, on the other hand, says they are near 3 million individual donors – They could be just a bunch of LSOSs but I’d rather be safe than sorry. Clinton only has 2.6 million. Clinton supporters are falling behind, and Trump supporters are stepping up. This is not good.

From the Clinton Campaign:

We’ve set a must-hit goal of raising $7 million before Hillary’s second debate with Donald Trump on Sunday — that’s the number we absolutely need to reach to get back on track, and we need 16 people from San Francisco to step up today to get there. Can you help right now? When you make your first donation (you haven’t stepped up yet!), we’ll send you a free Team Hillary sticker as a thank you.

I made a donation. Can you donate even $1? If we all donated just $1 we would add a substantial chunk of change to the campaign. If you can, please click here:  https://www.hillaryclinton.com

THANK YOU SO MUCH! 

The forum is open. Flap your lips.

SuzyQ: No worries, it is something to be concerned about. I googled and found this write: What if Hurricane Matthew Hits Florida’s Nuclear Reactors? Nice to see you here a lot lately – you are becoming quite a “regular.” :)  I hope you are well.

Peace & Love & Safety during this storm. 

Lastly, greed over a great story is surfacing from my “loyal”(?) readers. With all this back and forth about who owns what, that appears on my blog, let me reiterate that all material posted on my blog becomes the sole property of my blog. If you want to reserve any proprietary rights don’t post it to my blog. I will prominently display this caveat on my blog from now on to remind those who may have forgotten this notice.

Gratefully your blog host,

michelle

Aka BABE: We all know what this means by now :)

If you love my blog and my writes, please make a donation via PayPal, credit card, or e-check, please click the “Donate” button below. (Please only donations from those readers within the United States. – International readers please see my “Donate” page)

Or if you would like to send a check via snail mail, please make checks payable to “Michelle Moquin”, and send to:

Michelle Moquin PO Box 29235 San Francisco, Ca. 94129

Thank you for your loyal support!

All content on this site are property of Michelle Moquin © copyright 2008-2016

me

“Though she be but little, she be fierce.” – William Shakespeare Midsummer Night’s Dream 

" Politics, god, Life, News, Music, Family, Personal, Travel, Random, Photography, Religion, Aliens, Art, Entertainment, Food, Books, Thoughts, Media, Culture, Love, Sex, Poetry, Prose, Friends, Technology, Humor, Health, Writing, Events, Movies, Sports, Video, Christianity, Atheist, Blogging, History, Work, Education, Business, Fashion, Barack Obama, People, Internet, Relationships, Faith, Photos, Videos, Hillary Clinton, School, Reviews, God, TV, Philosophy, Fun, Science, Environment, Design, The Page, Rants, Pictures, Church, Blog, Nature, Marketing, Television, Democrats, Parenting, Miscellaneous, Current Events, Film, Spirituality, Obama, Musings, Home, Human Rights, Society, Comedy, Me, Random Thoughts, Research, Government, Election 2008, Baseball, Opinion, Recipes, Children, Iraq, Funny, Women, Economics, America, Misc, Commentary, John McCain, Reflections, All, Celebrities, Inspiration, Lifestyle, Theology, Linux, Kids, Games, World, India, Literature, China, Ramblings, Fitness, Money, Review, War, Articles, Economy, Journal, Quotes, NBA, Crime, Anime, Islam, 2008, Stories, Prayer, Diary, Jesus, Buddha, Muslim, Israel, Europe, Links, Marriage, Fiction, American Idol, Software, Leadership, Pop culture, Rants, Video Games, Republicans, Updates, Political, Football, Healing, Blogs, Shopping, USA, Class, Matrix, Course, Work, Web 2.0, My Life, Psychology, Gay, Happiness, Advertising, Field Hockey, Hip-hop, sex, fucking, ass, Soccer, sox"

Posted in Health & Well Being, Human Rights and Equality, Long Live Planet Earth!, Political Powwow | 11 Comments »

The Kaepernick Effect Spreads

Posted by Michelle Moquin on 3rd October 2016

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Good Morning!

Tracking the Kaepernick Effect: The anthem protests are spreading

The timeline of a movement.

Screen Shot 2016-10-03 at 9.22.55 AM

LAST UPDATED: September 29, 2016 at 3:30 p.m. ET

It’s been over five weeks since Colin Kaepernick was first spotted sitting down as the Star Spangled Banner was sung at a preseason NFL game because he refused to “show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color.”

In a relatively short period of time, his protest of police brutality and racial injustice in the United States has captivated the country and sparked a debate not only about the state of race relations in America, but about what exactly it means to be a patriot.

As black men have continued to be killed by police — most notably Terrence Crutcher in Tulsa and Keith Scott in Charlotte — Kaepernick’s initial protest has mutated and spread.

Overall, at least 45 NFL players from 13 NFL teams have knelt, sat, or raised a fist during the national anthem on game day. Three teams have linked arms or held hands as a sign of unity amidst the racial discord.

The protests aren’t just confined to the NFL, either.

Fourteen WNBA players from three teams protested in the playoffs. Star soccer player Megan Rapinoe took a knee during the anthem during a NWSL game, and later when representing the U.S. national team. Gold medal swimmer Anthony Ervin raised a fist as the anthem played during a meet in Brazil.

Perhaps most significantly, protests during the anthem have occurred in at least 37 high schools, 17 colleges, and two youth leagues in 30 states across the country.

Screen Shot 2016-10-03 at 9.26.36 AM

The peaceful protests have not come without a cost; kids as young as 11 have received death threats, and professional players have lost endorsements. Still, nearly every day, more athletes of all ages take a knee during the national anthem at sporting events, and there’s no indication they’ll stop anytime soon. In fact, some NBA players have already told reporters they plan to join in once their season begins.

ThinkProgress has been monitoring the spread of the movement closely. Below, you will find a timeline of the protests breaking out across the nation.

Screen Shot 2016-10-03 at 9.27.54 AM

This piece will be updated regularly as new anthem protests in the sports world emerge. Please email lgibbs@thinkprogress.org if you are aware of any missing from the list.

🏈🇺🇸🏈

Readers: Although the Kaepernick Effect is spreading, not everyone is kneeling down to the National Anthem. The Cleveland Cavaliers star Lebron James won’t join Colin Kaepernick. Although James did speak out against recent police killings that have amplified Kaepernick’s protests, saying that they have created a “scary-ass situation” for those who, like him, are parents of young black children.

Thoughts? Blog me. 

Abey et al: Thank you for your comments and chronicles. I have learned much by reading them. My heart goes out to all of you and I stand with you in hopes that the tides will turn. Please keep me posted on anything new. I will do my best to stay on top of the situation as well and blog about it.

✌🏽&❤️

Lastly, greed over a great story is surfacing from my “loyal”(?) readers. With all this back and forth about who owns what, that appears on my blog, let me reiterate that all material posted on my blog becomes the sole property of my blog. If you want to reserve any proprietary rights don’t post it to my blog. I will prominently display this caveat on my blog from now on to remind those who may have forgotten this notice.

Gratefully your blog host,

michelle

Aka BABE: We all know what this means by now :)

If you love my blog and my writes, please make a donation via PayPal, credit card, or e-check, please click the “Donate” button below. (Please only donations from those readers within the United States. – International readers please see my “Donate” page)

Or if you would like to send a check via snail mail, please make checks payable to “Michelle Moquin”, and send to:

Michelle Moquin PO Box 29235 San Francisco, Ca. 94129

Thank you for your loyal support!

All content on this site are property of Michelle Moquin © copyright 2008-2016

me

“Though she be but little, she be fierce.” – William Shakespeare Midsummer Night’s Dream 

" Politics, god, Life, News, Music, Family, Personal, Travel, Random, Photography, Religion, Aliens, Art, Entertainment, Food, Books, Thoughts, Media, Culture, Love, Sex, Poetry, Prose, Friends, Technology, Humor, Health, Writing, Events, Movies, Sports, Video, Christianity, Atheist, Blogging, History, Work, Education, Business, Fashion, Barack Obama, People, Internet, Relationships, Faith, Photos, Videos, Hillary Clinton, School, Reviews, God, TV, Philosophy, Fun, Science, Environment, Design, The Page, Rants, Pictures, Church, Blog, Nature, Marketing, Television, Democrats, Parenting, Miscellaneous, Current Events, Film, Spirituality, Obama, Musings, Home, Human Rights, Society, Comedy, Me, Random Thoughts, Research, Government, Election 2008, Baseball, Opinion, Recipes, Children, Iraq, Funny, Women, Economics, America, Misc, Commentary, John McCain, Reflections, All, Celebrities, Inspiration, Lifestyle, Theology, Linux, Kids, Games, World, India, Literature, China, Ramblings, Fitness, Money, Review, War, Articles, Economy, Journal, Quotes, NBA, Crime, Anime, Islam, 2008, Stories, Prayer, Diary, Jesus, Buddha, Muslim, Israel, Europe, Links, Marriage, Fiction, American Idol, Software, Leadership, Pop culture, Rants, Video Games, Republicans, Updates, Political, Football, Healing, Blogs, Shopping, USA, Class, Matrix, Course, Work, Web 2.0, My Life, Psychology, Gay, Happiness, Advertising, Field Hockey, Hip-hop, sex, fucking, ass, Soccer, sox"

Posted in Health & Well Being, Human Rights and Equality, Journeys within, Long Live Planet Earth!, Political Powwow | 46 Comments »

Stand Your Ground At Standing Rock

Posted by Michelle Moquin on 2nd October 2016

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Good morning.

I’m giving all that is happening with Trump a rest, at least for another day. There’s so much to disgusting news to report on him it’s challenging to pick just one. So I’m not going to today as well.

Instead I will turn my attention to an area that is probably not getting the media attention they deserve because this election has taken over the time and minds of most. At least for me it has been.

Thanks again Social Butterfly for posting the latest on DAPL. I watched the 8 minute live Facebook video.  I am so sad and sickened by how the indigenous people at Standing Rock are being mistreated. My heart goes out to them. It feels like their entire lives they have had to fight for their rights and their livelihood. Thankfully many people are coming together in solidarity, and prayer.

I found this while perusing the net.

From Bill Moyers:

Standing Firm at Standing Rock: Why the Struggle is Bigger Than One Pipeline

For indigenous people, the fight to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline is about reviving a way of life.

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A Standing Rock Sioux flag flies over a protest encampment near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, where members of the Standing Rock nations and their supporters have gathered to voice their opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline. (Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

The first sign that not everything is normal as you drive down Highway 1806 toward the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota is a checkpoint manned by camouflage-clad National Guard troops. The inspection on Sept. 13 was perfunctory; they simply asked if we knew “what was going on down the road” and then waved us through, even though the car we rode in had “#NoDAPL” chalked on its rear windshield.

“What is going on down the road” is a massive camp-in led by the Standing Rock nation, aimed at blocking the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (the DAPL in question), which would carry oil from the Bakken shale in North Dakota across several states and under the Missouri River. What began with a small beachhead last April on the banks of the Cannonball River on land belonging to LaDonna Brave Bull Allard has expanded to both banks of the river and up the road, to multiple camps that have housed as many as 7,000 people from all over the world. Because of them, first the Obama administration and then a federal court stepped in to temporarily halt construction of the pipeline near the campsite. Still, the people of Standing Rock and their thousands of supporters aren’t declaring victory and folding their tents just yet.

The legal struggles for a permanent shutdown of the pipeline construction continue: the people of Standing Rock have filed a lawsuit to halt construction, as has one of the South Dakota Native American nations and landowners in Iowa as well. As the lawsuits proceed, other members of the camp have been involved in nonviolent direct actions, locking their arms around construction machinery to prevent digging. Dozens have been arrested as part of those actions, including 22 people on Sept. 12, the day I arrived at the camp. That was days after the Obama administration’s call for a temporary halt to construction on the pipeline, and a stark reminder that the struggle was not over.

In addition to the legal battles and the direct actions, though, the people of the Oceti Sakowin and Sacred Stone camps were preparing for another challenge: a North Dakota winter. Already at night, the temperature drops to 40 degrees Fahrenheit; deliveries of blankets and warm clothing were constant, as was the chopping of wood for fires and discussion of what kinds of structures would allow the camps to stay in place through the bitter cold months ahead.

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“We’re already winterizing in all aspects of the camp, young people working with the elders to find, whether it’s longhouses, whether it’s yurts, whether it’s any kind of structures that would keep us warm for the winter,” said Lay Ha, who traveled to North Dakota from the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming in late August and became part of the camp’s youth council.

They’re staying partly out of suspicion: A temporary halt is, of course, just temporary. “As far as I can see, it’s just another way to lull us to sleep, make us go to sleep so we leave and then they’ll start again,” said Ista Hmi, an elder from Wanblee, South Dakota on the Pine Ridge Reservation and a member of the Seven Council Fires. “The Missouri [River] here, it was poisoned already from the pesticides and all that but we were still able to clean it,” he said. “But those are just topical compared to this oil. The oil, if it gets in here, it will start destroying the ecosystem underneath; it’ll be dead water.”

“We’re protecting the water, we’re not protesters,” explained Lay Ha. To him, as to many others in the camp, that the action is led by Native people, that it is built around their belief in nonviolence and in the spirit of prayer, is vital. It is, to them, much more than a protest.

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Ha is Arapaho and Lakota on his father’s side and Eastern Shoshone on his mother’s; he is part of what has become the largest coming together of Native people in, many said, more than 100 years. The flags that flap overhead represent something more than a fight for clean water — they are a powerful statement of solidarity, a declaration of common interest.

The first camp you pass once through the checkpoint is a small one on the side of the road overlooking the construction site. Further along, signs, flags and banners hang from the barbed-wire fence along the road. A massive banner declares “No DAPL!” Spray-painted on a concrete barrier are the words “Children Don’t Drink Oil.” Then emerges the breathtaking sight of what is now called the Oceti Sakowin camp: Flags from well over 200 Native nations and international supporters line the driveway into the camp, flapping in the high plains wind. People ride through the camp on horseback. At the entrance, when you drive in, you are greeted by security and a man with burning sage to smudge your car. Just beyond, at the main fire, a microphone is set up for speakers and performers: When we arrived, Joan Baez sat by the fire, singing “Blowin’ in the Wind.”

Kandi Mossett of the Indigenous Environmental Network was wearing a “No Fracking” T-shirt when I met her at the media tent, doing an interview alongside a delegation from Ecuador of indigenous people who have also fought the oil companies there. She is from northwestern North Dakota, the Fort Berthold reservation, and the oil that would travel through the Dakota Access Pipeline is extracted from her community. She came to Standing Rock for the formation of the original camp, known as the Sacred Stone camp, on LaDonna Allard’s land. At first, she remembered, the camp had anywhere from five to 30 people. Then, when Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the pipeline, put out notification that it was going to begin construction, the camp swelled to 200, then 700. It spilled over the river, into what was at first simply called the overflow camp. But as that camp grew, the campers began to feel it deserved its own name. Oceti Sakowin is the name for the Seven Council Fires, the political structure of what is known as the Great Sioux Nation. “We had for the first time in 200 years or more, the Seven Council Fires of the Great Sioux Nation coming together in one place to meet again,” Mossett said.

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Faith Spotted Eagle is also part of the Seven Council Fires, from the Ihanktonwan or Yankton band. She too was there on what she remembered as a wintry, blowing day in April when the Sacred Stone camp first opened. An elder and grandmother, she had also been part of the successful fight against the Keystone XL Pipeline, and pointed out that the networks activated by that fight were coming together again in North Dakota. In 2013, she said, a dream of her grandmother sent her to look at the 1863 treaty between her people and the Pawnee. On the 150th anniversary of that treaty, Jan. 25, 2013, those nations, along with the Oglala and Ponca, signed the International Treaty to Protect the Sacred from Tar Sands Projects. “In that treaty, we declared that forevermore we would be allies to stop this extractive move to destroy Mother Earth from the Boreal forest down to the Gulf,” she said. Since that time, other nations have joined, and the treaty was renewed with prayers and a donation to the Sacred Stone camp.

“A lot of those networks, it took years for them to come together. Standing Rock will do the same thing for the next one. It is a progressive healing and learning,” Spotted Eagle continued. In the unlikely alliances that came together, from the Keystone XL fight to Standing Rock, with farmers and landowners joining their actions, she noted, “That was where the power was.”

To Dave Archambault II, the tribal chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux, the struggle — and the response from indigenous people — is global. He greeted reporters Sept. 14 alongside the delegation from Ecuador. “We all have similar struggles, where this dependency this world has on fossil fuels is affecting and damaging Mother Earth,” he said. “It is the indigenous peoples who are standing up with that spirit, that awakening of that spirit and saying, ‘It is time to protect what is precious to us.’” Nina Gualinga, one of the Ecuadorian visitors, noted, “The world needs indigenous people. The statistics say that we are 4 percent of the world’s population, but we are protecting more than 80 percent of the world’s biodiversity.”

In an age where courts have deemed corporate entities “persons” with legal rights, Spotted Eagle sees a certain symmetry in the encampment’s philosophy: “The corporations have become individuals, the privatization has given them rights of individuals to just go out and wreak havoc,” she said. “Well, the river has a right and that right is being infringed upon.”

So do the people who live around it, she argues. “We are above all challenging the lack of consultation, of course, and the free prior and informed consent. Then, just our cultural freedom. We would never put a native pipeline underneath Arlington Cemetery,” Spotted Eagle added. But, she noted wryly, “It’s always a risk when you go into the courts. These courts are the courts of the conqueror.”

A sign along the highway near the Dakota Access Pipeline construction site reads “Flint Stands with Standing Rock.” (Sarah Jaffe for BillMoyers.com)

Winter will be hard, Spotted Eagle concedes. She said she hopes “the outside world will help” with donations. But, she added: “The ones that will stay are really going to have to bear down and address their cooperation even deeper, because if you go wandering off by yourself, you can perish, literally, up here.”

Kandi Mossett on a hill overlooking the Oceti Sakowin camp. (Sarah Jaffe for BillMoyers.com)

That outside support from individuals and environmental groups, she said, should respect the leadership of the Native people.” The message to the big greens is, stand by us, don’t co-opt us. And sometimes, they have to stand behind us, because 4,000, 7,000 Indians is a lot of Indians.”

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Some of the campers were planning trips back and forth, while others were committed to staying. The nature of the camp has been to swell and shrink; on the weekends, Kandi Mossett said, it grows exponentially. The estimate of 7,000 at one time does not count all the people who have passed through briefly, bringing messages of solidarity from places like Charlotte, North Carolina and Flint, Michigan. “I have people calling me, emailing me every day: ‘I am going to be able to come out in two weeks, are you still going to be there?’” Mossett said. “I say, ‘Of course.’”

For those who can’t make it to the camp, Mossett noted, there are other ways that supporters have held actions in solidarity with the camps. “We are targeting the financers of this project: the banks,” she said.

There are petitions, Facebook pages for the Sacred Stone and Red Warrior camps, and a call for Barack Obama to visit the camp. “We will welcome you, we will greet you, we will feed you, we will put up a tepee for you,” Mossett said.

The long-term strategy, she said, is similar to that of the Keystone XL project. “They told us ‘You are crazy. It is a done deal.’ They told us that about the Keystone XL and they are telling us that now about Dakota Access, that it is a done deal. We respectfully disagree.” If the permit is granted, she said, they will continue to hold the space, to risk arrest, to halt construction. “Companies and shareholders, they only have so much patience and they are losing money,” she noted. “That is the bottom line: money. The more we can delay them, the more we can stall them, the more we know we are winning.”

The sentiments of Mossett and Spotted Eagle underscore what is perhaps most significant about the camps along the Cannonball River: What is happening here is something more than just a fight to stop a pipeline.

The word I heard over and over again from the people I interviewed was “decolonize.”

In the speak-outs and prayer circles, speaker after speaker, from the Pacific Northwest and from the Amazon, from New York to Arizona recalled the historic violence committed against Native American people not far from where the camp stood. Many recalled the Battle of the Greasy Grass, what is taught to schoolchildren as the Battle of Little Bighorn, whichLaDonna Allard wrote was the last time the Oceti Sakowin came together. But for her and others, the massacres at Wounded Knee and Whitestone were closer to mind. It was the anniversary of the Whitestone massacre, where 250 women and children were killed by the US military, when private security guards turned dogs on the protesters at Standing Rock. It was Faith Spotted Eagle’s people, the Ihanktonwan, along with the Hunkpapa, that were killed there, and the use of police and security against peaceful protesters brought up those memories.

The echoes of historic struggles were everywhere, and to Spotted Eagle, they were reminders that the fight for the water is just a part of the fight for an entire way of life that was nearly crushed. She was raised speaking Dakota, and counted herself lucky to have her language and the worldview that came with it. The grass-roots organizing that brought together the camp, she said, was helping the Standing Rock people and other tribal governments to look past the structures imposed on them by the process of colonization. “If we don’t stop and every single day examine how I have become like the colonizer, I asked my daughter, ‘What is going to happen someday if we lose our songs, if we lose our language and we no longer think like Natives?’ She said, ‘Then the colonization process is complete.’”

In the camp, they experimented with bringing back the long-ago structure of the Oceti Sakowin. “The second part of that struggle is to wade through the colonialism that has happened between then and now and to figure out, ‘What can we bring back with some modifications that will work for the people?’” she said. “There have been a lot of attempts to revive the Oceti Sakowin, but it hasn’’t happened because we didn’’t have a common focus.”

The common struggle has in turn opened up a space for different people to come together and share their songs and dances, their prophecies and histories. The lack of good cell phone service, Lay Ha noted, forces people to be more present. “It just brings you back to the old days where you hear the language, you hear our culture, you get to see youth riding on horseback and it’s really a change, it’s really decolonizing ourselves.”

“We are at the right point in time,” Spotted Eagle agreed. “We are free at this space in time.”

Walking around the camp, you pass singing circles and the kitchen — Tuesday night the menu was moose, brought all the way from Maine by a visitor to the camp. A nurse from the medic tent made rounds, making sure that people knew that at night, the Standing Rock ambulance parked on the grounds would leave but the medics would be on duty. Young children played volleyball and posed for photographs, finished from their day at school — a fully recognized school that teaches both the core curriculum so children at the camp won’t fall behind their schools at home, and also teaches songs and dances, languages and history, about the treaties and the fight for the water.

At night, campfires burned and tepees glowed, lit from within, as the open mic for speak-outs gave way to singing and dancing.

“We have had a few growing pains, but that is to be expected when you go from 30 people to 1,000 people in two or three days,” Mossett said. “There are a lot of logistics behind the scenes, things that people don’t see. Where are people going to go to the bathroom? Bringing in porta potties. Waste disposal. It was a really beautiful thing to see the community step up on our own and say, ‘Did you forget we are sovereign nations? We are going to do this and make it happen.’”

The coming together of the nations was something Mossett wanted for as long as she could remember, and that more than anything helped her envision a victory, not just against the Dakota Access Pipeline, not just against the whole extractive industry but for something much bigger.

“This pipeline would have already been built if we hadn’t come out here, taken back the power for ourselves and said, ‘Hey, nobody is going to help us or protect us except for us,’” Mossett said. “I think it was the nonviolent direct actions. In fact, I know that it was the nonviolent direct actions that got us to this point.”

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*****

Readers: Are any of you out there at Standing Rock? Can you tell us more? My HOPE is that your efforts will prevail. ✌🏽& ❤️

Blog me.

Sign if you agree to stop the pipeline.  Thank you!

/SB: Another feather in Obama’s cap! So happy about this one. Thank you, Mr. President!

Vohkinne: Nicely said. And I agree with you about our beloved president.

Happy Sunday, everyone. As always, thanks for being here.

Peace out.

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michelle

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“mni Wiconi.”**

Posted by Michelle Moquin on 26th September 2016

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**Water is life.

Good morning.

/SB, Abeque, and all the indigenous peoples:  Thanks for posting your concerns. I knew very little about this pipeline. However I did more reading and what I have read really concerns me.

Our Native Americans have suffered through so much from the massacre and genocide of 12 million peoples, to robbing them of their lands, to displacement of their children (really, kidnapping!) into foster homes, taking them away from their culture, their language, their traditions and their families.

And now this.

When a young Native American girl saysthe oil industry keeps pushing for it because they don’t care about our health and safety. It’s like they think our lives are more expendable than others,’ looking at history, she is correct.

We have built several holocaust museums that condemns Germans. And yet it is another issue to build a museum that confronts our own genocide. There isn’t a museum that confronts the genocide that was perpetrated by our own ancestors towards Native Americans or towards African Americans.

Even in Washington, the Native American museum doesn’t address the genocide but rather a sort of a “historical amnesia”. We have no problem pointing the fingers at others who have done such atrocities, but when it comes to ourselves, when we can’t even examine, not to mention document,  who we are and what we have done in our own country, it is truly sickening.

And now this.

Energy Transfer Partners demolished Native American burial grounds damaging irredeemable ancient cairns and stone prayer rings, and attacked the peoples with dogs and pepper spray. Did they even care?

An earlier plan that would cut the pipeline across the Missouri River upstream from Bismarck, North Dakota, was rejected to avoid contaminating the state capital’s water source, yet they had no issue building the pipeline downstream to the present contested crossing, where the Standing Rock Sioux says they’ll be the ones who suffer in the event of a spill. 

Considering that from 2012-2013 alone, there were 300 oil pipeline breaks in the state of North Dakota, my guess is the Native Americans have every right to be concerned over the safety of their water, and their livelihood, and every right to want to protect their land.

It’s obvious that the livelihood of the Native Americans aren’t valued as much as whites when you consider their horrific past and present day treatment.

Lawrence O’Donnell speaks well to this:

I know I’m digressing here but, like the murders of African American men, and our shouts of “Black Lives Matter,” cops killing blacks is the modern day lynching, could this pipeline be the modern day genocide? Ok before you go off on me, because I know that sounds radical and far-fetched – and I don’t mean to sound like a fear-monger, but biological warfare was used against the Native Americans in the past.

Yes, genocide may not be intentional but after what happened in Flint Michigan (A 2011 study on the Flint River found it would have to be treated with an anti-corrosive agent for it to be considered as a safe source for drinking water. Adding that agent would have cost about $100 a day, and experts say 90% of the problems with Flint’s water would have been avoided.), my feeling is, nothing is beyond the white man and the atrocities he will commit to his fellow humans when money is the motivating factor. The way OTWs are grossly and continuously mistreated in this country, I wouldn’t throw that question into the trash just yet.

Isn’t it about time we treated our Native Americans with the respect, care, and humaneness that they deserve? Like all OTWs who don’t see the light of justice, my heart goes out to them. I stand in support of them with them.

Here’s a recent write from the Huff Po:

The Super Twisted History Of The Dakota Access Pipeline

Signs hang from heavy machinery after protesters stopped construction on the Energy Transfer Partners Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota

Archaeologists from institutions including the Smithsonian and Chicago’s Field Museum joined opposition to Energy Transfer Partners’ project this week, accusing it of destroying burial grounds.

Completion of the Dakota Access oil pipeline seemed almost inevitable. But then the Obama administration stepped in this month and offered a respite to the medley of Native Americans, environmentalists and Midwestern landowners who oppose it.

Three federal departments announced that work would stop on a pivotal section of the 1,172-mile pipeline in North Dakota while they second-guessed how the Army Corps of Engineers approved most of the project in July. The move was applauded by critics, who say the pipeline could pollute drinking water from the Missouri River and destroy land that’s culturally important to Native Americans. Many also object to the energy company acquiring land from family farmers in Iowa via eminent domain.

The controversy stems from a series of government decisions since 2014, when Energy Transfer Partners announced a plan to carry 570,000 barrels of crude per day from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to existing infrastructure in Illinois.  A look now at those choices explains why thousands demonstrated against the pipeline and dozens were arrested near the Standing Rock Sioux’s reservation and in Iowa in the summer.

“They’ve been using backdoor process to get the pipeline approved,” said Dallas Goldtooth, an activist with the Indigenous Environmental Network. “The antiquated permitting process was not designed for mega fossil fuels projects.”

New pipeline opponents emerged this week, when archaeologists from the Smithsonian, Chicago’s Filed Museum and other institutions wrote a letter to President Barack Obama this week. The letter criticized the Energy Transfer Partners’ “recent destruction” of Sioux burial grounds.

But construction rushes ahead, apart from a section near an encampment of hundreds of Native American protesters. It stands at 60 percent complete, according to a memo from Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren to employees this month.

Critics say the following moves explain why the pipeline looks to them like an environmental hazard and a government boondoggle.

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The Dakota Access Pipeline would stretch 1172 miles, from North Dakota oil fields to an existing Illinois pipeline.

Oil Spills, Climate Change Concerns

Critics say that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers used a lenient environmental review that didn’t adequately examine the potential for oil spills or the impact on climate change.

Getting the federal agency’s approval was essential because the pipeline would cross its rivers and waterways 202 times.

The Army Corps granted permission to an environmental assessment relied on skewed data from Energy Transfer Partners, according to attorney Carolyn Raffensperger. The assessment made alternatives to the pipeline, such as using railroads to move the oil, which sound costlier and it came to other conclusions that underestimated the environmental risks, said Raffensperger.

Pipeline spills happen nearly every day in the U.S., federal data shows. The environmental assessment didn’t address what damage a Dakota Access leak could cause, Raffensperger said.

“The approval process for pipelines is fatally flawed,” said Raffensperger, who’s litigating against the pipeline’s use of eminent domain in Iowa.

Critics argue the pipeline should have been vetted through a more rigorous environmental impact statement. The Army Corps says on its website that option would only be available if the environmental assessment had turned up anything troubling.

“The [agency] drafted an Environmental Assessment) to determine if the placement and operation and maintenance of the pipeline on federal real property interests have potential to cause significant environmental effects,” it states. “If there is such potential, the [Army Corps] will prepare an Environmental Impact Statement.”

The Army Corps has shown some concern for negative consequences if hazardous materials were to get loose elsewhere.

It rejected an earlier route that would cut across the Missouri River upstream from Bismarck, North Dakota, partly to avoid the risk of contaminating the state capital’s water source. But it was remapped downstream to the present contested crossing, where the Standing Rock Sioux says they’ll be the ones who suffer in the event of a spill.

“We have designed the state-of-the-art Dakota Access pipeline as a safer and more efficient method of transporting crude oil than the alternatives being used today, namely rail and truck,” said Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren in a memo to employees last week that the company released to the press.

Click over to watch the video:

 

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‘Loophole’ Speeds Up Project

Out of all the local, state and federal agencies with some jurisdiction over the project, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers had the most influential input, although only 37 miles of pipeline would exist inside its territory. Its approval came last in the review process.

Sierra Club lawyer Doug Hayes said the Army Corps exploited “a loophole” opened by Obama’s energy priorities to push the pipeline through the review process. Hayes is litigating against the use of eminent domain to seize property from land owners along the pipeline’s route in Iowa.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers subjected the pipeline to what’s called the Nationwide Permit 12 process and narrowly looked at “several hundred” waterways crossing essentially as independent projects, rather than judging it as one, massive structure, Hayes said. This permit program was designed for small structures like boat ramps and mooring buoys that affect fewer than half an acre of the Corps’ jurisdiction.

As far as we can tell, it was only used for truly minor pipeline projects” until Obama called for the expedited approval of the Keystone XL pipeline in 2012, he said.

The project should have been subjected to what’s known as a 404 permit, a part of the Clean Water Act that considers the impact from projects like airports, dams and mining exploration, according to Hayes and other opponents.

The Army Corps declined to answer The Huffington Post’s queries about the pipeline because of ongoing litigation, but material on its website said the agency could only evaluate the sections on its land, rather than the pipeline in its entirety.

“For this project, [the Army Corps] has jurisdiction over a very small portion of the overall pipeline and may not regulate where it does not have jurisdiction,” the site post states.

US-ENVIRONMENT-OIL-PIPELINE-PROTEST

The Standing Rock Sioux tribe has accused Energy Transfer Partners of deliberately destroying important artifacts, including graves shortly after historical sites were identified.

3 Federal Agencies Called Out The Army Corps

Long before the protesters garnered the support of celebrities including Leonardo DiCaprio and Pharrell Williams, three government offices expressed dismay at the Army Corps’ decision making.

The Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of the Interior and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation in March wrote separate letters raising the possibility of water contamination and destruction of historic sites in terms echoing the Standing Rock Sioux, The Associated Press reported in April.

They were concerned that tribes along the route had not been properly consulted and called on the Army Corps to go ahead with a formal environmental impact statement.

Those fears were realized earlier in September, according to the Standing Rock Sioux, who accused the company of deliberately destroying important artifacts, including graves shortly after the historical sites were identified.

Protesters entered the company’s land in response, where security guards reportedly used pepper spray and dogs to disperse them.

“They went out of their way to desecrate this land,” said Allison Renville, who was at the protest camp that day and grew up on the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate reservation in South Dakota. “People were really upset. We were kind of shocked that it was even happening.”

Energy Transfer Partners insists that it is culturally sensitive to what might be underground and has denied encountering anything significant. The company has also claimed that protesters have attacked its workers, though spokeswoman Vicki Granado refused to provide specifics of any alleged altercation “for security reasons.”

The company’s chief executive wrote in a memo that multiple archaeological studies “found no sacred items along the route.” Environmental worries are likewise overhyped too, he wrote, as other pipelines crisscross the region. There are 25 crude oil and natural gas pipelines in North Dakota, according to the state’s pipeline authority.

Farmers’ Land Taken for Pipeline

In Iowa, protesters have fumed over the state’s use of eminent domain to force landowners to sell land that Energy Transfer Partners needs to build the pipeline. Police arrested more than 40 demonstrators for alleged trespassing at a construction site on Sept. 17.

Farmland cannot be seized through eminent domain in the state, attorneys said, unless it’s for a project with a public benefit like a highway or sewer line. Despite opposition, the Iowa Utilities Board in March determined that “the proposed pipeline will promote the public convenience and necessity.”

Among the roughly two dozen property owners at the time fighting the eminent domain order were a man trying to preserve land in his family since 1898, a family of turkey farmers and a woman who grows crops like blueberries, rhubarb and asparagus.

“We do not think there’s any public benefit from this at all,” said Kari Carney, executive director of 1000 Friends of Iowa. “The process was really sort of rammed through.”

Energy Transfer Partners claims that the pipeline will annually generate $129 million in property and income taxes.

As a financial precaution, the Iowa Utilities Board said its approval was contingent on the pipeline’s parent companies, which also includes Sunoco Logistics and Phillips 66, to put up money in the event the pipeline causes an emergency in Iowa.

An Iowa Utilities Board spokesman declined to comment due to ongoing litigation.

The next steps

Though the Obama administration froze work on one section of the project near the Standing Rock Sioux, construction continues elsewhere as much of the route is on private land.

Other tribes have joined the Standing Rock Sioux, who have a lawsuit pending against the Army Corps over the approval process. Some Iowa landowners have sued the state for its use of eminent domain.

The wildcard may be what decision the Obama administration reaches. Though the president was earlier a proponent of the Keystone XL pipeline, he rejected it last year. The statement the Department of Justice, the Army and the Department of Interior issued last week announcing work would not proceed near the tribe raised the question of whether the administration has undergone a transformation on projects like this.

“This case has highlighted the need for a serious discussion on whether there should be nationwide reform with respect to considering tribes’ views on these types of infrastructure projects,” the joint statement said.

If the pipeline comes to fruition, Energy Transfer Partners stands to reap huge benefits as other companies have abandoned plans for competing pipelines in the area.

“We got so lucky,” CEO Kelcy Warren told Bloomberg last year. “All of our competition vaporized.”

 *****

Readers: Where do you stand? Thoughts?

The first Debate between Clinton and Trump is tonight 9:00 PM EST. Don’t forget to watch it.

Taylor: Please disregard my response to you yesterday. I misread your comment. Thanks.

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michelle

Aka BABE: We all know what this means by now :)

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